TRANSOM WINDOWS IN ARCHITECTURE

I have a lot of architectural design minutiae buzzing around in my head right now as I finalize the details of our upcoming house remodel.  One element I really love and am hoping I can incorporate into the new house is transom windows above the interior doorways (we're still figuring out our interior elevations, whether we'll have the ceiling height, etc.)

Any trick that helps spill natural light from brighter areas to more dimly-lit zones is a genius move.  Plus, they add a ton of architectural charm! 

Often times in the design and building process there are so many little details like this that don't cost a whole lot extra to do, but pack a lot of design punch.

Aren't these transoms just so pretty?  They can be done in a very classic way with lots of detailed molding, or in a more modern way with a simpler approach to the trim.

(all photos via here)


















A little Monday morning inspiration for you.  And we're off and running!

xo,



9 comments:

Naomi said...

Beautiful! I love that look, too. Wish my ceilings were high enough to accommodate! Thanks for a bright start to Monday morning :)

Christine@NicheStyleBlog.com said...

I love, love, love these windows! Hoping my next house has tall ceilings!

Anonymous said...

Love transoms- thanks for posting these! We did not do them when we moved in our house, but I imagine in some places you could do it cheater-style by hanging multi-paned mirrors above door frames- would still throw more light around.

Laura J said...

Love the look. But as someone who insisted on getting real divided light windows for the entire house, I will tell you that they are a PAIN to clean. The larger the transom and the fewer the # of divided panes, the easier your life will be . . . .

Kathy, NM said...

Traditionally, transoms sweetest attribute is the drafting of air — either warmed or cool air flow. I love old transoms which can be vented inward or outward: cool air drafted in from a shady porch or summer heat vented out from the stuffy ceiling. Vintage transoms were double-hinged, tilting either direction on little chains (or cranked, as today). The keys to comfort in historic homes!

Rosa said...

You are welcome Naomi! Thanks for following along!

Rosa said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Rosa said...

Yes I've been thinking exactly that. They don't always need to be operable if you don't think you'd be opening them up much. Thanks for weighing in!

Rosa said...

Great tip, thank you! We are aiming for a slightly more contemporary twist on our classic home, so I think I will opt for fewer divided panes as well.

ShareThis

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...